amwriting, The Crows

The Crows: Teaser

Extract from Chapter 3 of The Crows, introducing RICKY PORTER and his lovely childhood toy, GERALD. CW: mild gore, horror, strong language, Gothic vibes FEATURED IMAGE: A detail from Thomas Brown's original illustration for The Crows 18 April   It had been a bloody awful day. His farsight was on the wane, as it usually was… Continue reading The Crows: Teaser

amwriting, genre, Pagham-verse, Uncategorized, world building

Pagham-on-Sea: Undead Fashion

Guest Post: Clementine Wells Miss Clementine Wells was alive [or, as she prefers, a member of the Ante-dead community] for twenty-two years and has been dead since 1793. She prefers the term 'Revenant'.1 This is a type of undead which does not require the blood of the living, but is known for its violent rages.… Continue reading Pagham-on-Sea: Undead Fashion

amwriting, genre, Pagham-verse, The Crows, Uncategorized, world building

Pagham-on-Sea: Werewolf Fashion

If you're not playing #WipWorldBuilders this month, the theme is FASHION and PHILOSOPHY and the prompt card is here, and available via the hosts' and guest host's accounts. I've suggested prompts for this November, when the theme is FOLKLORE and ART. What will October be? We'll find out soon! Fashion in Pagham-on-Sea is as in… Continue reading Pagham-on-Sea: Werewolf Fashion

amwriting, writing tips

June Twitter Chat! Sex & Villainy #villainsleepover

#VillainSleepover Anyone want to join in a new weekly/biweekly twitter chat #villainsleepover? If you do, follow the hashtag (if not, mute it!) as we will kick off in June with discussions around sex/sexuality and 'villainy'. A few of us who enjoy these kinds of chats and especially love talking about the darker side of human… Continue reading June Twitter Chat! Sex & Villainy #villainsleepover

amwriting, Pagham-verse, The Crows, world building

Folklore of Pagham-on-Sea: The Meteor (Part 1)

The following folklore is, like Pagham-on-Sea, entirely fictional.  A Medieval Account of the Meteor Strike, c.1189 Chronica Maiora (Anonymous monk of Fairwood Abbey, a Benedictine foundation of 1165, dissolved 1532) trans. and ed. Harold Bishop, (Basingstoke University Press, 1973) In the days of the Romans, a hairy-tailed star fell from heaven and struck the ground… Continue reading Folklore of Pagham-on-Sea: The Meteor (Part 1)