Gothic Fiction, Uncategorized, werewolves

Let’s Talk About Wolves #2: Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf?

Look at the soft, succulent flesh on that, Canis whispered, wheedling now, all warm-blooded and fattened up ripe and tender, you'll still taste the vodka in the meat, in her warm, fragrant blood - - oh god, Meredith thought, creeping closer until the scent of Tina's subtle perfume filled her nostrils, Fresh blood pulsing into my mouth, over… Continue reading Let’s Talk About Wolves #2: Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf?

Book Review, Gothic Fiction, Uncategorized

Welsh Gothic Tropes V: The Sin-Eater

Introduction The Sin-Eater was a Welsh export to America, now so forgotten in Wales and so connected with Appalachia, that most Welsh might now consider it to be an American phenomenon, rather than a part of their own history. The Sin-Eater has their* own chapter in Jane Aaron's Welsh Gothic (Chapter 6) and this is… Continue reading Welsh Gothic Tropes V: The Sin-Eater

Gothic Fiction, Uncategorized

Welsh Gothic Tropes III: The Druid

Introduction CW// incest and infant death discussed in one short story. The Druid has had a negative press, or, to quote Aaron, 'enjoyed a demonic reputation', since Julius Caesar's account in De Bello Gallico (c.58-49 BC). Caesar claimed that Druids officiated at human sacrifices and mentions the infamous 'wicker man', powerfully re-imagined by Folk Horror… Continue reading Welsh Gothic Tropes III: The Druid

Gothic Fiction, Uncategorized

Welsh Gothic Tropes I: Death Omens

IntroductionOne element that recurs throughout Welsh Gothic fiction is ... the death omen. Whether it's a raven being shot and showering the bride-to-be in blood as it plummets down a well ('The Prediction', 1827), or a cow biting off its own teats on a failing farm (Martha, Jac a Sianco, 2004, I kid you not),… Continue reading Welsh Gothic Tropes I: Death Omens

Book Review, Gothic Fiction

#AmReading: Wales, Land of the Living Dead I: Context and Poetry (1940s-1997)

Introduction In this first post (this time, one of three) I will look at Chapter 4 of Jane Aaron's Welsh Gothic, (UWP, 2013). This time, it's a look at Wales as the land of the living dead in metaphorical terms, putting these texts into historical context, and looking at these themes in poetry. Next time (Thursday… Continue reading #AmReading: Wales, Land of the Living Dead I: Context and Poetry (1940s-1997)