Book Review, reblogged post

Book review: Thirteenth by C.M. Rosens

Meredith Debonnaire

Book cover is primarily green, shaded to look as though light is coming from the right side. A central gold embellishment resembles an eye inside a circle. Above that, the book title "thirteenth"is written in uneven capitals. Below, the author name "C.M. Rosens" in a smaller fontGran’s house was the oasis of calm Katy Porter craved.

*note: Thirteenth is the sequel to The Crows, so you should read that first. Also this review may have spoilers for The Crows, so be aware.*

C.M. Rosens is in a league of her own, something I say with both love and enthusiasm. In The Crows, she grabbed every gothic horror trope she could find, put them through the blender, and somehow made me hate Carrie’s painfully mundane ex-boyfriend more than the literally-a-murderous-cannibal neighbour. In Thirteenth, she takes the idea of the Chosen One by the horns and then covers it in eldritch tentacles and teenage rage. It was an absolute joy to read.

Our protagonist is Katy Porter (she’s a cousin of Ricky Porter, a main character in The Crows who eats people and tells the future, yet I still want to just wrap him…

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Gothic Fiction, reblogged post

From Romancing the Gothic Blog: 100 Women Writers in Horror, the Gothic and Supernatural Fiction from the 18th Century to 2021

An amazing list of 1-100 authors (and I am on the list!! o.O) Please tip at http://www.ko-fi-com/SamHirst if you can. This is such a good resource.

Romancing the Gothic

I recently completed a twitter thread on 100 women. You can find it here, if you’re interested. It includes more gifs and pictures! But for ease, I’ve collated them all into one list. The entries are fairly brief but I’m happy to tackle any questions you have! Enjoy the list and if you feel like supporting me or chucking me a tip, there’s a ko-fi and a patreon

1 – 10

1) Clara Reeve (1729-1807)

Reeve responded to Walpole’s genre starting Castle of Otranto with The Old English Baron (1778). It got rid of excessive supernaturalism and kept the medieval peril. It was originally published as ‘Champion of Virtue’ in reduced circles in 1777.

2) Sophia Lee (1750 – 1824)

Author and playwright, she and her sisters ran a school in Bath. Her Gothically claustrophobic text The Recess (1785) reimagined history, giving Mary, Queen of Scots, two daughters and telling…

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reblogged post, Uncategorized

Make Yourself a Coat of Arms

I love this – I’ve published on arms and seals and the uses of medieval iconography in my academic life, but this is a really fun exercise and might be useful for self-reflection.

Some medieval facts:
> If you weren’t important enough to have your own arms, you would bear those of your lord. For example, William Marshall (1146/7-1219) started off in the household of the Tankervilles and bore their arms until he was allowed to carry his own. [You’ll notice he was very long-lived: nobles often lived beyond 60, with the benefit of good constitution and diet etc].

>There was a sense of visual unity in family crests, but individuals chose what went on them as they inherited the title and lands. Some chose to adopt their father’s, but add something of their own; their son might revert to a further direct paternal ancestor (because patrilineal primogenture was the model of inheritance) and adopt their great-grandfather’s arms without changing it. It depended on what they wanted to convey!
More on my blog (on hiatus): melissajulianjones.wordpress.com

Loved this post!! Recommend giving this blog a follow.

Dewi Hargreaves

I’ve been trying to make a personal coat of arms (or achievement, as it’s properly known) for a long time now.

First thing’s first: in the UK and many other countries, you can’t just go ahead and design your own coat of arms. To officially acquire one, you have to have one presented to you by the College of Arms. But it’s extremely unlikely they’re ever going to knight me, and if they did, I doubt they’d let me use the one I came up with myself. So, no, this isn’t an official coat of arms.

But it’s a symbol designed using heraldic convention which I could still use to represent myself, especially if I get it copyrighted. So you can do that too, if you have the same peculiar desire to have a coat of arms that I do. (Just don’t go calling yourself a knight on any…

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reblogged post, Uncategorized

The Enthusiast’s Guide to Spotting Murder Ladies

I can’t stop loving murder ladies (or writing them, it seems), so please enjoy this blog post from Dr Sam Hirst and go follow this blog for more top notch Gothic content. Welcome to our discrete guide for the discerning. Many of you will have turned to us because you are simply exhausted by the… Continue reading The Enthusiast’s Guide to Spotting Murder Ladies

reblogged post, Uncategorized

How to tell if you’re a Gothic or Gothic Romantic Hero

Absolutely my new favourite blog on the whole wide internets

Silly little, lovely little stories

Regency History: A Regency History guide to The Mysteries of ...

Do you have a spare wife lying around? Perhaps in your attic?

Have you recently wrestled a bear (to save a pig thief), engaged in a naked pirate fight and escaped the clutches of a murderous prostitute and her gang?

Have you gambled away your fortune and given all your money to a fellow debtor?

Did you lose your girlfriend about a book ago and aren’t entirely sure where she’s gone?

Have you ever mysteriously disappeared for years only to come back rich and find that made absolutely no difference?

Have you ever rescued your lady love  only to lose her a day later after losing a duel with her dastardly uncle?

Did a servant actually rescue your love interest?

Have you murdered several of your previous wives?

Has your lady love been held prisoner in a half-ruined castle in the Apennines?

Did a mysterious old dude longing for…

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